It’s a Cracker!!!

Silver fulminate (AgCNO) is the highly explosive silver salt of fulminic acid.
Silver fulminate is a primary explosive that has very little practical value due to its extreme sensitivity to impact, heat, pressure and electricity. The compound becomes progressively sensitive as it is aggregated, even in small amounts; the touch of a falling feather, the impact of a single water droplet or a small static discharge are all capable of explosively detonating an unconfined pile of silver fulminate no larger than a penny and no heavier than a few milligrams. Aggregation of larger quantities is impossible due to the compound’s tendency to self-detonate under its own weight.


Silver fulminate was first prepared in 1800 by Edward Charles Howard in his research project to prepare a large variety of fulminates. Since its discovery, its only practical usage has been in producing non-damaging novelty noisemakers as children’s toys and tricks – and Cracker snaps!

Silver fulminate, often in combination with potassium chlorate, is used in trick noise-makers known as “crackers”, “snappers”, “whippersnappers”, “pop-its”, or “bang-snaps”, a popular type of novelty firework. They contain approximately 200 milligrams of fine gravel impregnated with a minute quantity (approximately 80 micrograms) of silver fulminate. When thrown against a hard surface, the impact is sufficient to detonate the tiny quantity of explosive, creating a small report from the supersonic detonation. Snaps are designed to be incapable of producing damage (even when detonated against skin) due to the buffering effect provided by the much greater mass of the gravel medium. It is also the chemical found in Christmas crackers. The chemical is painted on one of two narrow strips of card, with abrasive on the second. When the cracker is pulled the abrasive detonates the silver fulminate.


Remember this next time you pull a cracker!!!!!

via Blogger http://prlabpak.blogspot.com/2012/12/its-cracker.html

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Posted on December 7, 2012, in Useful Information and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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