Measuring Conductivity

The conductivity (or specific conductance) of an electrolyte solution is a measure of its ability to conduct electricity. The SI unit of conductivity is siemens per meter (S/m).

Conductivity measurements are used routinely in many industrial and environmental applications as a fast, inexpensive and reliable way of measuring the ionic content in a solution. For example, the measurement of product conductivity is a typical way to monitor and continuously trend the performance of water purification systems.


In many cases, conductivity is linked directly to the total dissolved solids (T.D.S.). High quality deionised water has a conductivity of about 5.5 μS/m, typical drinking water in the range of 5-50 mS/m, while sea water about 5 S/m (i.e., sea water’s conductivity is one million times higher than that of deionised water)

Conductivity Meters – Two electrodes with an applied AC voltage are placed in the solution. This creates a current dependent upon the conductive nature of the solution. The meter reads this current and displays in either conductivity (EC) or ppm (TDS).

Our two part guide will help you to measure conductivity accurately.  The guides answer the 7 most asked questions regarding conductivity and the second part is a comprehensive guide on theory and measurement.

Just click on the links below to download your copies.

Part 1 – http://www.prlabs.co.uk/news/article.php?Id=232
Part 2 – http://www.prlabs.co.uk/news/article.php?Id=233

via Blogger http://prlabpak.blogspot.com/2013/12/measuring-conductivity.html

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Posted on December 13, 2013, in Useful Information. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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