Kevlar

Kevlar® is the registered trademark for a para-aramid synthetic fiber, related to other aramids such as Nomex and Technora. Developed by Stephanie Kwolek at DuPont in 1965, this high strength material was first commercially used in the early 1970s as a replacement for steel in racing tires. Typically it is spun into ropes or fabric sheets that can be used as such or as an ingredient in composite material components.

Kevlar® is a material formed by combining para-phenylenediamine and terephthaloyl chloride. Aromatic polyamide (aramid) threads are the result. They are further refined, by dissolving the threads and spinning them into regular fibres. When woven, Kevlar® forms a strong and flexible material. If layers of the woven Kevlar® are combined with layers of resin, the resulting ‘rigid’ material is light and has twenty times the strength of steel. It is also superior to specialist metal alloys. However, Kevlar® is expensive due to the demands of the manufacturing process and the need for specialist equipment.

Currently, Kevlar® has many applications, ranging from bicycle tires and racing sails to body armor because of its high tensile strength-to-weight ratio; by this measure it is 5 times stronger than steel on an equal weight basis.
Aramid Fibre
Kevlar® is a well-known component of personal armour such as combat helmets, ballistic face masks, and ballistic vests. Other military uses include bulletproof facemasks used by sentries and spall liners used to protect the crews of armoured fighting vehicles.  Emergency Service’s protection gear also uses Kevlar® sometimes if it involves high heat (e.g., tackling a fire), and Kevlar® body armour such as vests for police officers.
Bullet Proof vests
 
Kevlar® is used to manufacture gloves, sleeves, jackets, chaps and other articles of clothing designed to protect users from cuts, abrasions and heat. Kevlar® based protective gear is often considerably lighter and thinner than equivalent gear made of more traditional materials.
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Posted on April 4, 2014, in Useful Information. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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